Tag Archives: Prawns

Golden Shrimps (with Salted Egg Yolk) – 黄金笑虾虾

“One of the important Chinese festive seafood dishes. It helps to spread laughter around!”

Chinese Lunar New Year, we (Chinese) emphasize on cooking symbolic dishes with auspicious dish name. Prawn, or called it shrimp, is one of the compulsory items to be used to cook CNY dishes as shrimp, in Cantonese, is pronounced as HA (虾). Its pronunciation resembling the sound of laughter, ha ha! It represents happy life with lots of laughter ahead. Do you also notice? Even the curvy shape of each shrimp resembles smiley lips. So, eating shrimps are symbolical during Chinese festive, especially to the Cantonese dialect group. read more

Prawns in Thick Miso & Tomato (with Egg Drop) Gravy

“You can never resist this beautiful and lips-smacking prawns with thick miso and (chili) tomato gravy dish.”

This dish was introduced by one of the old friends years back. So, I envisioned and cooked this dish at home recently, with the ‘recipe’ left in my memory. So, I would say this dish is more like an adaption of his original recipe which supposed to use prawn with shell intact, rather than my ‘curled-up’ prawns. I did it this way to save me from peeling the prawn shells over dinner, and hated if were to dirty my hands during meals. And, with the shaped prawns, I think it makes the dish look more presentable, at least it was to me. Well, of course, some may prefer the whole prawns as it is believed to enhance the flavor of the dish with the seafood taste. It’s up to you. read more

Chilled Prawn Salad with Cheesy Vegetables

Something easy and healthy you will like to cook at home

I promised, to share my recipes for the delicious homecooked western cuisine.

I will start with the appetizer first. This considers a cold dish as I’ve served the prawns chilled, and this idea was adapted from the first dish, the cold platter, which commonly served in some occasions/ events e.g wedding banquet dinner or something like that.. And this chilled prawns are usually served with fruits salad. So, I was inspired to came out with the vegetable version, hoping to create a slightly more balanced diet. read more

Cereal Prawns (麦片虾)

“Cooking is about versatility. Save your bucks, cook this scrumptious cereal prawn dish with 3-in-1 cereal sachets which already are available in your kitchen or drinks pantry!”

Learn how to cook cereal prawns is definitely a plus point to save your bucks as having cereal prawns at the restaurants could cost you at least S$30 for the dish. However, if you cook this at home, it will simply shack off a $10 note from your wallet for the ingredients. Moreover, it’s easy to cook, and delicious to eat! read more

Prawn Noodle Soup with Prime Ribs in Slow Cooker (排骨虾面汤)

“Prawn noodle soup with super tender pork ribs in slow cooker”

It has been years since I first made prawn noodle soup (see my homemade Prawn Noodle Soup recipe). It is so simple to cook and devour on your very own “home-taste” prawn noodles. Moreover, prawn noodles are definitely healthier choice than having curry laksa noodles.

This time, I cooked a slightly more ‘complicated’ version of prawn noodle soup, with pork ribs added, too. Steps remained, but the soup base was cooked with additional ingredients which makes the soup a special one. It was adapted from recipe of Ms. Yvonne Soh, which has been featured under Taste column of The Sunday Times last week (thanks). The mention of “using cloves, star anise and black peppercorn” in prawn noodle recipe caught my eyes. Never thought that these spices will go along with prawn flavoured broth, so I thought I should give it a try! read more

Braised Seafood Mee Sua (焖海鲜面线)

“Get hooked on my seafood treats with crisped Mee Sua.”

Mee Sua, or you call it vermicelli, a Chinese noodle dish which you eat it especially during birthday to symbolise longevity. Mee sua simply means long noodle thread (面线). Usually, mee sua is made into very thin strand, and it’s brittle when cooked. The apperance of Mee Sua is normally in whitish colour, and to be sold in to a box of 5 – 6 bundles. This type of Mee Sua is good to make into soup noodle.

I did not use the usual whitish bundles in this recipe, in fact. I used the crisped (pre-fried) type. Never heard of it? I have first spotted this crisped version in the wet market, last Sunday when a lady was buying 2 packets of it at the same store. She recommended it to me over my hesitation with the noodle choices, and commented that this crisped Mee Sua gets softened quicker than crisped Ee-fu noodle, to shorten the braising time. It’s also easier to chew, especially for younger children. read more