Vietnamese Summer Rolls with Spicy Peanut Sauce

“A side dish, that’s as good as a 1-dish meal!”

When come to Vietnamese food, the summer rolls are the sides which I would never missed. Yes, this is my favorite side dish in the Vietnamese cuisine. So much so that I would want to make my own so that I could have it anytime, even at home. And, I would eat summer rolls as a meal, sometimes. Why not, it has all the vegetables, meat, prawns and bee hoon in one! :)

Summer rolls are not difficult to make, but needed quite a bit of preparation work done. I wouldn’t mind, because I knew I would have the best spicy peanut sauce made by myself that I could adjust the taste best suited to my liking. You are right, the summer rolls would never complete without a nice dipping sauce. More

Homemade Achar (Asian Pickled Vegetables)

“Achar, the best side dish for me!”

Helloooooo… Long time no post and hope you miss me (chuckles). I promised one of my readers who requested Achar recipe on my FaceBook to post the recipe for her soon. And, I hope this doesn’t come too late for her liking. :) Achar is known to be a Nyonya dish, but well-liked by many other Asian dialects, too. This is an Asian-style pickled vegetables dish which tastes sweet and sourish with a little bit of spicy flavour in it. Achar goes so well with plain porridge, rice, nasi lemak, fried bee hoon, or even to be eaten on its own!

Blanch and Squeeze dry the vegetables till really dry. Simply pat dry the pineapples.

Cooking Achar is simple, but the preparation is not so. It involves many steps, from making the seasoning paste (rempah) till cooking the dish… Preparation usually takes up to 1 hour while cooking the dish takes only 5 minutes to complete. As for my version of Achar, I’ve added my open-secret trick to this recipe, the blanching of vegetables including cucumber. Many recipes used just the raw vegetables and they find it taste equally great, but I prefer the additional blanching step (but of course a MUST to squeeze-dry them after that). To me (taught by my mum), the blanching is an important step to retain the crunchiness of the vegetables for even longer time! The standing procedure of the dish is also essential in making the Achar. It is best to store the Achar for more than a day (in the refrigerator) before consumption. This is to ensure the spice flavouring has been fully sponge-in by the vegetables.

Sound complicated? But seriously, it’s worth all the effort! More

‘A-Balling’ Peanut Soup Dessert (Glutinous Rice Balls in Sweet Peanut Soup)

“An iconic Singapore Hawker Dessert made at home”

Not sure why this is called ‘Ah Balling’ or ‘Yah Boling’ in Singapore, but apparently this Teochew dessert soup is so popular and well liked by the people where it has become one of iconic hawker delicacies in Singapore for the past decades.

Since weather here was pretty cooling as it had been either raining or pouring, it might be good if we had some piping hot beverages or food to warm ourselves. The combination of ginger soup and glutinous rice balls is always her favorite, but I was thinking of a change in its soup for this time instead of making the ginger soup for the rice balls repeatedly. This famous Ah Balling just came to my mind… More

Lotus Root and Peanut Soup with Prime Ribs (莲藕花生排骨汤)

“The best home-taste Asian soup for the foreign home landers..”

This traditional Chinese soup never fails to smother you with plenty of home feeling. Many of our mothers or even ourselves cook this soup so often that it has then become one of the staple food in our households (chuckling). If you are now landing in a foreign place alone, and missing your mum’s cooking or the hometown dishes, boil this soup by your own. The ingredients are simple and easily found in most Asian markets. This home-taste goodness, with a foundation of mineral-rich ingredients, will both satisfy your appetite and heart as a foreign home lander (smile).

Ingredient
1 small lotus root, washed and sliced into 1cm thick lengthwise
1 carrot, cut into bite size pieces
1 small cup of raw peanuts with skin intact, soaked in a pot of water overnight.
300 grams of prime pork ribs, blanched
More