Tom Yum Yogurt Cream Spaghetti Pasta

“Place where Thai meets West”

Be sure to serve this mild spicy and refreshing pasta dish with the freshest seafood like large prawns, mussels or squids, and you will be impressed by this non soup version tom yum savory.

I used yogurt as the cream in this recipe, to create healthier and lower fat dish. Otherwise, feel free to use full cream, for more creamy texture. More

Quick Japanese Sesame Sauce Noodle Dish

“Japanese sesame sauce noodle dish, simply top with your favourite ingredients to make a good additions to the dish, as desired.”

This recipe came to me from one of my office buddies, Joyce. She loved this noodles dish for its effortless cooking method and the delicious taste of the Japanese sesame sauce, likeable by the family. So, I took her recommendation and got a bottle of the sesame sauce off the shelves. Tried it and I liked it. Most importantly, it’s so easy and quick to prepare as a simple lunch or dinner. A great recipe to busy working class.

The choice of toppings in this noodle dish is variable, as your wish. I thought there were too many elements on my plate as I tried making it a more balance diet by assembling many different kinds of greens and meat ingredients which added up a large chunk altogether. Well, reduce or modify the additions, if necessary, as there is no hard and fuss rule in this recipe.

Simply get a bottle of this delicious Japanese sesame sauce at Japanese products shelf in major supermarkets. This noodles dish can be prepared in a flash! More

My Wok Life’s Signature Fried Bee Hoon for Breakfast

“Breakfast Fried Bee Hoon for my office buddies”

Last week, two of my office buddies and I had craving to eat bee hoon for breakfast when saw the fried bee hoon dish selling at our office cafeteria, but we stopped ourselves from buying it as it looked so greasy which actually curbed our ravenous, then. So, I decided to fry my own bee hoon for the next morning.

The recipe of this fried bee hoon was posted long ago (see recipe: Stir-Fried Bee Hoon with Stewed Pork), but this time, I had to double the amount of my original recipe to cater all 8 – 10 of us, and also cooked it with slight variations. More

Fuzhou-Style Noodle in Thick Broth (福州淋面)

“Don’t mistaken, it’s not the common Lu Mian that I’ve cooked. This is my home ‘secret’ recipe of savoury Fuzhou Noodle Dish!”

I guess most of you heard or tasted Lu Mian (卤面) which commonly sold in many hawker stores and food courts in Singapore. Lu Mian (Noodle in braised sauce) is one of the Fujian (福建) cuisine, if I am not wrong. However, I am not going to introduce recipe of Lu Mian here, my recipe is more a traditional style of similar noodle dish, with its origins from Fuzhou (福州).

So, what’s the difference between Fujian and Fuzhou? I think Fujian is a Province of China, while Fuzhou is the capital of Fujian Province. What I am sure was both Fujian and Fuzhou dialect groups speak different dialects, they are not the same pronunciation at all! Most people in Singapore belong to Fujian dialect group instead of Fuzhou. So, Fuzhou cuisine might not be as familiar as Fujian cuisine, to us. And, my mum’s dialect group, happened to be actually.. Fuzhou. So, I get to learn some special dishes from her/ or grandma (smile). More

Fragrant Fried Bee Hoon with Stewed Pork Chops

“Flavourful fried bee hoon for lunch over a lazy noon”

You will feel hard-pressed to refuse seconds of this irresitible stir-fry. Chinese-style fried bee hoon (rice vermicelli or thin rice stick), with tender stewed meat mingle with its rich and flavourful stewed meat sauce coated on every strand. Crunchy bean sprouts add even more texture to it.

Wanted an express but delicious meal as lunch over a lazy weekend last week, I cooked this bee hoon to ease my cooking, at the same time, satisfy everyone’s tricky taste bud. Not only ‘lazy’, I was tired, after a long week, so busy over preparation for the festive at office. Yes, we are going to have the yearly group-wide staff Christmas Eve party in the office. So, no choice, I have to conserve my energy to organise the party for 100 over person! Luckily, I have gotten help from my fellow RC team, too.. More

Singapore Hawker-Style Fried Carrot Cake (Chai Tau Kway) Recipe

Fried carrot cake is also known as “Chai Tau Kway” (菜头粿, Chinese pronounced as: Cài Tóu Guǒ). Not the usual sweet dessert, but a kind of Chinese steamed carrot rice cake.

This is one of the all-time favourite local delicacies in Singapore, and it is one of the Teowchew delicacies. That’s why we usually call it Chai Tau Kway, a pronounciation in Teowchew dialect.

In Singapore, there are mainly two types of Fried carrot cake selling at various hawker stalls and food court. Generally, the “white” carrot cake is more popular than the “black” one here. In fact, only Singapore has the “white” version of carrot cake cooking method, I believed (smile). This unique “white” colour frying method simply refers to frying without dark soy sauce, while the “black” carrot cake will be added with dark sweet sauce, and such “black” version is more porpular in Malaysia instead. More

Fried Kway Teow (炒粿条)

“Singapore-style Char Kway Teow (with yellow noodle) you may cook and taste from home!”

Char kway teow, which means “fried flat rice noodles“, this is one of the popular hawker food in Singapore. It has also been termed as unhealthy food due to its excessive oil and/ or pork lard used in cooking this dish. It is yet one of the famous local delicacies, for its extra flavoursome taste.

Singapore-style fried kway teow is not cooked with only one noodle type, but often combine with cooked yellow noodle (round and thin yellow strands) in the dish. Not sure why, but you tends to experience better mouthfeel with the combination. Yes, I loved it! More

Hokkien Mee (Singapore-style)

“Express meal with my homecooked Hokkien Mee!”

Stir-fried Hokkien noodles dish is cooked and presented differently in Singapore and Malaysia. Even choice of noodle used in the dish is different. For instances, Singapore uses flat strands and cooked with more watery and the gravy is less dark in colour, while Malaysia uses thick round strand resembling udon and usually cooked with loads of super dark colour thick soy sauce.

I loved both styles, and am going to share the Singapore-style Hokkien Mee where you may easily have it in many “Zhi-Char store 煮炒摊” (food store selling Chinese cuisine in coffee shop/ hawker centre). More