Tag Archives: Noodles

Clear Soup Mee Tai Muk (汤米台目)

“Flavourful soup noodle dish with Asian-type short bouncy rice noodle”

Other than plain porridge, this soup noodle dish would be my first option whenever I need some light meals.

Since this is a soup dish, it was so nice to have during this rainy season, especially in the cold nights. It makes my entire body warm by having the warm soup in the stomach.

Taste of this soup base was full as I added Thai fish sauce. So, addition of milk is no longer necessary here.

Well, It’s easy to cook, easy to eat, and tasty to enjoy as light meal. read more

Dry Wonton Mee Recipe (干捞云吞面)

“Chinese egg noodle with Wonton dumplings, we called it, Wanton Mee, and this is one of the Singapore’s hawker delights, the local-style of having delicious fuss-free noodle meal, anywhere & anytime”

Easy-to-assemble Singapore local gourmet to be fixed as dinner or lunch at home. I had the dry version for more flavour, but you can cook it in soup, if wished. Simply omit the listed condiments, add the blanched egg noodle into the same soup used for the wonton. Well, I’ll show you the soup version next time.. read more

Tom Yum Yogurt Cream Spaghetti Pasta

“Place where Thai meets West”

Be sure to serve this mild spicy and refreshing pasta dish with the freshest seafood like large prawns, mussels or squids, and you will be impressed by this non soup version tom yum savory.

I used yogurt as the cream in this recipe, to create healthier and lower fat dish. Otherwise, feel free to use full cream, for more creamy texture.

Ingredients
300 grams of dried angel hair or spaghetti noodles
8 x-large tiger prawns
1 large or 2 small brinjals aka eggplants, halved lengthwise then sliced crosswise but do not cut it through entirely, its skin should remain undivided as a base to the sliced fleshes


50 grams of Tom Yum paste
500ml of chicken stock
2 tablespoons of plain yogurt
1 tablespoon of Thai fish sauce
1 teaspoon of coconut sugar (or brown sugar)
Lime juice squeezed from 1 small lime
1 small onion, chopped
2 cloves of garlic, minced
20 grams of butter (or more)
2 teaspoons of olive oil for sautéing brinjal, plus 1 teaspoon for coating of wok before sautéing prawns, and 1 more teaspoon for heating the sauce pan for cooking later, in total = 4 teaspoons
read more

Quick Japanese Sesame Sauce Noodle Dish

“Japanese sesame sauce noodle dish, simply top with your favourite ingredients to make a good additions to the dish, as desired.”

This recipe came to me from one of my office buddies, Joyce. She loved this noodles dish for its effortless cooking method and the delicious taste of the Japanese sesame sauce, likeable by the family. So, I took her recommendation and got a bottle of the sesame sauce off the shelves. Tried it and I liked it. Most importantly, it’s so easy and quick to prepare as a simple lunch or dinner. A great recipe to busy working class. read more

My Wok Life’s Signature Fried Bee Hoon for Breakfast

“Breakfast Fried Bee Hoon for my office buddies”

Last week, two of my office buddies and I had craving to eat bee hoon for breakfast when saw the fried bee hoon dish selling at our office cafeteria, but we stopped ourselves from buying it as it looked so greasy which actually curbed our ravenous, then. So, I decided to fry my own bee hoon for the next morning.

The recipe of this fried bee hoon was posted long ago (see recipe: Stir-Fried Bee Hoon with Stewed Pork), but this time, I had to double the amount of my original recipe to cater all 8 – 10 of us, and also cooked it with slight variations. read more

Fuzhou-Style Noodle in Thick Broth (福州淋面)

“Don’t mistaken, it’s not the common Lu Mian that I’ve cooked. This is my home ‘secret’ recipe of savoury Fuzhou Noodle Dish!”

I guess most of you heard or tasted Lu Mian (卤面) which commonly sold in many hawker stores and food courts in Singapore. Lu Mian (Noodle in braised sauce) is one of the Fujian (福建) cuisine, if I am not wrong. However, I am not going to introduce recipe of Lu Mian here, my recipe is more a traditional style of similar noodle dish, with its origins from Fuzhou (福州). read more