Category Archives: Singapore Favourites

Local Delicacies

Fragrant Fried Bee Hoon with Stewed Pork Chops

“Flavourful fried bee hoon for lunch over a lazy noon”

You will feel hard-pressed to refuse seconds of this irresitible stir-fry. Chinese-style fried bee hoon (rice vermicelli or thin rice stick), with tender stewed meat mingle with its rich and flavourful stewed meat sauce coated on every strand. Crunchy bean sprouts add even more texture to it.

Wanted an express but delicious meal as lunch over a lazy weekend last week, I cooked this bee hoon to ease my cooking, at the same time, satisfy everyone’s tricky taste bud. Not only ‘lazy’, I was tired, after a long week, so busy over preparation for the festive at office. Yes, we are going to have the yearly group-wide staff Christmas Eve party in the office. So, no choice, I have to conserve my energy to organise the party for 100 over person! Luckily, I have gotten help from my fellow RC team, too.. read more

Singapore Hawker-Style Fried Carrot Cake (Chai Tau Kway) Recipe

Fried carrot cake is also known as “Chai Tau Kway” (菜头粿, Chinese pronounced as: Cài Tóu Guǒ). Not the usual sweet dessert, but a kind of Chinese steamed carrot rice cake.

This is one of the all-time favourite local delicacies in Singapore, and it is one of the Teowchew delicacies. That’s why we usually call it Chai Tau Kway, a pronounciation in Teowchew dialect.

In Singapore, there are mainly two types of Fried carrot cake selling at various hawker stalls and food court. Generally, the “white” carrot cake is more popular than the “black” one here. In fact, only Singapore has the “white” version of carrot cake cooking method, I believed (smile). This unique “white” colour frying method simply refers to frying without dark soy sauce, while the “black” carrot cake will be added with dark sweet sauce, and such “black” version is more porpular in Malaysia instead. read more

Fried Kway Teow (炒粿条)

“Singapore-style Char Kway Teow (with yellow noodle) you may cook and taste from home!”

Char kway teow, which means “fried flat rice noodles“, this is one of the popular hawker food in Singapore. It has also been termed as unhealthy food due to its excessive oil and/ or pork lard used in cooking this dish. It is yet one of the famous local delicacies, for its extra flavoursome taste.

Singapore-style fried kway teow is not cooked with only one noodle type, but often combine with cooked yellow noodle (round and thin yellow strands) in the dish. Not sure why, but you tends to experience better mouthfeel with the combination. Yes, I loved it! read more

Hokkien Mee (Singapore-style)

“Express meal with my homecooked Hokkien Mee!”

Stir-fried Hokkien noodles dish is cooked and presented differently in Singapore and Malaysia. Even choice of noodle used in the dish is different. For instances, Singapore uses flat strands and cooked with more watery and the gravy is less dark in colour, while Malaysia uses thick round strand resembling udon and usually cooked with loads of super dark colour thick soy sauce.

I loved both styles, and am going to share the Singapore-style Hokkien Mee where you may easily have it in many “Zhi-Char store 煮炒摊” (food store selling Chinese cuisine in coffee shop/ hawker centre). read more

Kou Rou with Taro Yam (芋头扣肉)

“Steamed Taro and Pork Belly (Yu Tou Kou Rou 芋头扣肉)”

We loved Kou Rou (扣肉), and I loved it even more if it’s cooked with yam (means taro, we called it yam here in SG)!

My previous post on Mei Cai Kou Rou was done without adding yam. This time, I did.

I believed adding the yam to ‘Kou Rou’ dish originated by Teochew cuisine. Not too sure,  but one thing I was certain that it made the dish even more wonderful! Just swap the Mei Cai with yam and pork belly,  or adding yam to the Mei Cai Kou Rou, works as well. read more

Pork Belly with Preserved Vegetables (Mei Cai) Recipe (梅菜扣肉)

“Homemade ‘Mei Cai Kou Rou’ (梅菜扣肉) can be as good as restaurant standard”

Hey, it may not be as good as restaurant chef, but it is for sure very delicious for a homemade version (chuckling)!

I cooked it at home as outside is selling expensive for this pork dish. I could understand why as its preparation and cooking methods are kinda complex.

I took me for than 2 hours to get this dish done, from steeping of preserved vegetables (梅菜) to steaming the pork belly. Well, it was because each detail has to be executed in orderly manner for great result. However, it may look deceptively complicated, but after the frying step, it should be alright, as it left only the steaming, and then, the presentation part that matters. read more