“Shatin Lung Wah Pigeon (沙田龙华乳鸽)”

We went all the way to Sha Tin (沙田) to have the roast pigeon. An area which supposedly famous for roast pigeon. However, nowadays, the fame of best roast pigeons and many better roast pigeon stores/ restaurants moved to another area named Dai Wai (大围), an area just next or very close to Sha Tin, that was what our Hong Kong friend told us. Shall it be our next target area for roast pigeon (winking smile)?!

Anyway, I still insisted to have the roast pigeon in the originally famous area, Sha Tin, where I longed for. We chose this decades-old restaurant named Lung Wah Hotel (沙田龙华酒店). The signature pigeon dish of this restaurant is not really the roasted type, but braised one, surprisingly.

I heard that this restaurant is famous, not only for the pigeons which they picked only the 25-day old premium type of young pigeons, but also on the background history of this restaurant. Our Hong Kong friend told us that people came here for pigeon meal because this restaurant was the first restaurant that serves pigeon dishes. It also has a small compound situated just right in front the passsage way of the entrance, for a visit to the pigeon loft.

We took MTR to Sha Tin, and transferred to mini bus for a shuttle ride. It wasn’t too long a journey from Mong Kok (旺角), but will be a little hectic if you go there by MTR from Hong kong island, or extreme east or west side.

Just cross an overhead bridge, after alighting at the nearest bus stop opposite the hotel. This hotel is located near Hong Kong Ikea furniture mall. Address: 22 Ha Wo Che Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (香港新界沙田下禾輋22號). Check out exact direction here: My Note Book on the Web.

Since this meal was our late dinner (about 9pm to about 11pm when they were about to close for the day), we did not order much food for 3 of us (treats to the same Hong Kong friend, this time). We selected, first, of course the braised pigeon (豉油王乳鴿). Well, pigeon meat was tender and juicy as clamed to be no more than 26-day old young pigeon. Pigeon meat tastes pretty much like chicken meat, but this is much more tender and sweeter, of course (picture above).

Frankly, I preferred the roasted one. Roast pigeon was much tastier than the braised one, to my preference. It was crisped, but texture of the meat wasn’t too dry. I liked the roast pigeon! (Hmm… did you see the ‘hole’ on the pigeon’s neck, I could roughly guess how it was killed to cook. With one look of it yielded kinda… an instant reflux feeling from my stomach, after eating the meat. Mind me.)

For conservative diners, please order this sweet and sour pork (咕老肉), if pigeons aren’t your cup of tea. It was so appealing to us when first saw the dish ordered by other diners. We already had decided to order this dish, even before settling down with a suitable table seat. We chose to dine at the open air area filled with round plastic tables covered with checker table cloth each, and chairs. Unlike traditional Chinese set-up indoor, outdoor area is more a ‘cafe’ kind of ambiance.

This sweet and sour pork was nicely cooked with juicy pineapple and capsicum cubes. Indeed, it did not fail our expectation. These caramelized pieces of meat were extensively delicious!

This stir-fried Chye Sim with prawns wasn’t impressive. No doubt, the prawns were fresh and springy. However, the greens were tasted a little of its bitterness. So, instead of ordering the vegetable dish, go ahead and try another of their famous dishes, San Shui Tofu (山水豆腐) which made using stream water.

Please remember, this is a decades-old restaurant which does not serve diet Coke, Coke zero, Coke light or Pepsi light. They served this, the extinct glass bottled Coke, instead.

For this meal for 3, we paid about HK$410 (S$85).